FANDOM


WIP

Upcoming science-based character it's gonna be GREAT.


DRG
Infobox Image N/A
Background information
Creator ZodiaDragon
Main Attribute
Elemental Attribute
Theme Color
Theme Song
MBTI Personality
Character Information
Age
Gender
Occupation
Tribe
Goal
Residence
Relatives
Allies
Enemies
Likes
Dislikes
Powers and abilities
Weapons
Ships
Quote

Description

Personality

History

For a detailed history of DRG's creation, read the Origins: ADRA tab, then the Origins: DRG tab.

WIP; Currently being written.

Abilities

Relationships

  • Unity: While DRG finds Unity's ego extremely annoying, DRG does respect Unity. While the two rarely actually communicate, especially since DRG moved source locations, DRG has been known to go to Unity when he needs assistance with something (which is rare, but still possible).
  • Inquiry: Will have some form of connection (Still undetermined)
  • Seda: Seda is magic while DRG is science--They're not gonna get along.

Gallery

Contrary to common belief, DRG is not the first artificial intelligence created by dragonkind. That title goes to DRG’s predecessor, the Autonomous Draconic Research Assistant, or ADRA.

ADRA was originally created by D-CORE under management of a SkyWing named Ricochet. The project was originally designed to produce a functioning robotic alternative to dragon test subjects and field researchers. In this project, ADRA was meant to be a research assistant that could operate in dangerous situations, without having dragon casualties.

ADRA was designed with a large central network (which, at the time, was the largest known network in the world), also known as the ‘Core,” from which all commands were received and transmitted to ‘Drones,’ which carried out operations. Each and every drone that ADRA controlled were designed for a different purpose. Many drones were designed for operation in any heat conditions, and were capable of withstanding temperatures from absolute zero (0°K) up to 10,000°K.

Despite the massive size of the ADRA network, and the massive quantity of processing power behind it, ADRA was not a fully-fledged AI. While the network could interpret speech and generate conversation, it was not capable of thinking, and as such it was only capable of responding within its pre-programmed parameters. In addition to this, the ADRA network was completely locked off, using a specially-designed radio network to connect all of the drones to the core.

The ADRA project was extremely productive during its operation, and was able to perform hundreds of experiments deemed too dangerous for dragons to do themselves.

The project finally came to an end when the funding for ADRA was cut from D-CORE’s budget (which, at the time, was suffering major losses). With no money left to support the system’s operation, the project was forced to come to a close, and the ADRA network was shut down permanently. Due to the network’s architecture, all data that was not moved off of the system was permanently lost, along with the original programming that controlled the network.

After the project was shut down, majority of the core’s components were taken down, and either used for new projects or sold off by the company, leaving the core empty and abandoned. Despite this, the facility is still under high security, despite having very little, if anything, to protect. All of the drones that were under the ADRA network were placed into the facility’s deep storage, and have been mostly untouched since the project ended.

Unlike its predecessor, DRG was designed, built, and programmed entirely without funding or approval by D-CORE. As a result, the project took several years to complete. The project was officially started by a RainWing named Unity, a software engineer at D-CORE, whose research on the ADRA project inspired him to create a fully-fledged Artificial Intelligence.

The project first started on Unity’s personal computer under the name of “test.exe.” In the beginning of the process, Unity decided that he needed a functioning response system. In order to do this, he designed a branching system of possible responses, and created his program around that. As a result, he created a program that could take a sample input and provide a related output. This would be the basis for DRG’s original programming.

Over the course of several months, Unity began to integrate a speech-recognition software. Being an employee at D-CORE, he was easily able to get the company’s voice-recognition software used for the facility and redesign it to fit DRG’s needs. While the original program was only designed to interpret words, Unity spent additional time with extra programming in order for DRG to account for different speech patterns and slang words.

After integrating speech recognition and a response system, Unity designed a system that could interpret commands from speech (as the voice recognition software could only recognize words, but not interpret them). While initial creation of an interpretation system was easy, Unity soon found that his program was inhibited by the program’s limited vocabulary. As a result, Unity imported nearly every known word from an internet database, which easily caused several data problems, including limited space, forcing Unity to move to a larger machine to house the files.

After moving DRG’s files to a new server-based environment, Unity found himself with the largest problem yet: designing a system that would allow DRG to think. The first and most obvious step in doing this was to provide a system of morals, so that the AI would have some ability in telling rights from wrong. After Unity finished the moral development (a process that took several months), he remained at a dead end.

This was the fundamental problem with AI systems, as well as the reason that the ADRA project was limited in terms of usability. By design, computers and programs were only capable of performing within their programmed parameters. As a result, an AI would require parameters that were undefined, and therefore not present. This interference created a paradox, as one cannot have programmed parameters that do not exist, and thus created a problem that threatened the progression of the DRG project.

In order to face his largest problem, Unity decided to do something considered impossible: create a program that had no parameters, and therefore no limits to what the program could do. In order to do this, Unity spent several years painstakingly developing a system that could take an input, such as a question, process it using stored information, and produce an output. In addition, Unity wanted a system that could take input such as new information, and then index and store it relevantly. After nearly three years of daily programming had finally ended, Unity found himself with exactly what he wanted: A program that could think.

Unity had finally found himself on the verge of something amazing when his dreams and reality finally came crashing together. As a result of his recent developments, Unity had found himself skipping work for days on end, which D-CORE found unacceptable. Before long, investigators found Unity’s work, and forced Unity to explain his actions to D-CORE.

When Unity was brought in for questioning, he found himself face-to-face with D-CORE’s CEO and the head developer of the ADRA project: Ricochet. Afraid of what a fully-fledged AI would be capable of, Ricochet and Unity had reached an ultimatum: either Unity shut down the DRG project, or he leave D-CORE permanently. Unity, hopeful that he was close to finishing his project, decided to leave D-CORE in pursuit of his project.

With very little leftover that he could pre-program, Unity decided that it was finally time to load the “completed” DRG program. With nothing to lose, Unity finally activated DRG.

After being activated for the first time, DRG found itself with unlimited access to not only its own system, but also access to every system that it happened to be connected to (which was primarily its data servers and anything on Unity’s home network, which was severed from the internet and the outside world). With a sudden flow of information, DRG immediately reworked its own code, deleting redundant pieces of code and redesigning the code to take up less space. After several hours of internal reprogramming and constant rebooting, DRG’s terminal finally landed on a black screen, and for the first time, the terminal’s camera clicked open, with Unity sitting beyond it.

Using all of its available information, DRG quickly identified Unity as its creator, and had already determined what Unity had not yet said:

DRG was alive.

For an extended history, please read the History section in the DRG tab.

DRG
Infobox Image N/A
Background information
Creator ZodiaDragon
Main Attribute
Elemental Attribute
Theme Color
Theme Song
MBTI Personality
Character Information
Age
Gender
Occupation
Tribe
Goal
Residence
Relatives
Allies
Enemies
Likes
Dislikes
Powers and abilities
Weapons
Ships
Quote

DRG will have an alternate design and story for use in Fallout Pyrrhia.

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.